Cotton is the star fiber of any locker room (jeans, pants, t-shirts, sweaters), relaying the flax in a slightly "forgotten" fiber state. Flexible and comfortable, linen has its own qualities But its higher price can scare more than one brand if not a consumer.

Two natural fibers at a very different price: we explain everything to you!

If we had to make a comparison, The cotton would be a bit of the cool boy of the class and the linen the first of the class not too sociable ... It is full of qualities but it is not necessarily appreciated at its fair value.

The important thing is to make you understand that the flax comes back in force (It is local and environmentally friendly) but that its technical characteristics make it much more complex to work and more expensive than cotton.

So that you can see more clearly, we will try to describe the reality of our profession by explaining you The manufacturing differences between linen jeans and cotton jeans: follow the guide!

3- Lin pushes in France, cotton not (or very little)

We will not surprise anyone with this first point, especially if you live in the north of France. And yet, we often forget that flax is above all A French fiber !

 

Lin fields in Normandy

It smells good France ... and more precisely Normandy.


With more than 70% of global flax cultivated between Caen in Dunkirk, France is the 1st flax producing country in the world And the 4th consumer worldwide.

So why import a material that does not grow in France (cotton to do jeans in our case) When we can use a noble and available fiber on our territory?

Even if cotton is the basic natural fiber which is used for the manufacture of all jeans, Unfortunately, it does not grow in France. If you wonder why, it is simply because France has a temperate climate and cotton does not support temperatures below 10 ° C (for the flower) and at 2 ° C (for the rod).

 

Comparison between places of production of flax and cotton The main flax and cotton producing countries, a very different classification.

 

"Easier to find than to weave"

Linen is in abundance on our territory, of course, and yet today, 90% of linen produced in France is exported abroad to return to finished product. Linen weavers simply disappeared little by little since linen was no longer a fashionable fiber.

It is by developing our linen jeans that we realized that linen was ultimately easier to find than to weave and that the price of Denim Lin could not be at the same price as our cotton-elastane.

Factory Linen Vosges Dao Davy Jeans French-min
The weaving factory of our denim in linen in Rupt-sur-Moselle in the Vosges.


As for spinning, the bet is even more complicated. When we developed Denim Lin, we were amazed to discover that there are no longer any No linen spinning in France, the job simply ... disappeared. Fortunately for us, the profession still remains in Europe.

2022 note: Since 2018 as a path traveled for the relocation of a complete sector in France, from the plant to the finished garment. Today France is equipped with spinning! There are several initiatives that have emerged. We can't wait to use French thread in our next creation!

 

2- Linen is more ethical than cotton

If cotton culture is among one of the most economical it is because it is part of an intensive culture that hides an "invisible" cost not passed on to the consumer : the human, health and environmental cost linked to a disastrous production model for soils, water tables and workers (SES).

Regarding manufacturing conditions in Vietnam, everything is told in The video "the brothers" right here.

 

Discovery of a jeans manufacturing plant in Vietnam Discovery of a jeans manufacturing plant in Vietnam in 2011

And this is where cotton draws its image from "dunce" from natural fibers. To grow 1 kg of cotton (necessary for the manufacture of a single jeans), it is necessary Between 5,000 and 10,000 liters of water. And it does not stop there, since the cotton consumes more 50% of agricultural pesticides used worldwide.

"What to annoy more than one"

Besides cotton, linen therefore plays its role as "first in the class" very well. With its ecological performance (half a bottle of water is necessary to grow 1kg of linen and it does not consume No or little pesticides), linen has something to annoy more than one in the class of natural materials.

 

Linen / cotton water consumption

 

The objective is to highlight differences and inequalities. French linichers are subject to the Labor Code, hence Automatic repercussion of work on the price of raw materials. In India, China or the United States, everything is very different and it is this invisible cost of which we were talking to you that affects the worker and not on the consumer.

1- Linen is rarer than cotton

Cotton production in the world is greater than 25 million tonnes. For linen, it's around 200,000 tonnes per year, namely 125 times less than cotton. Difficult to imagine, but it is the weight gap between a Labrador ... and an elephant!

 

Cotton flower

 

"A rarer, more noble material ... and necessarily more expensive"

He arrives on social networks (generally in store in Nancy you understand by chatting with us) that some do not understand the higher price of our linen jeans (and you are right to ask the question!).

What may surprise is that our organic cotton jeans are between € 120 and € 130 while our linen jeans are € 160 (€ 175 since 2021). A price difference which is explained by the fact that flax is a rarer, more noble ... and necessarily more expensive material. To explain you even more simply, for technical reasons the linen is woven less quickly than cotton. Who says, longer duration of weaving, says a higher blow out.

2022 note: This article was written in 2019. The pandemic and the new geopolitical context have passed by subjecting to the raw materials that we use an increase in prices. Today you can multiply the price of our raw materials indicated below by 2.  

Explanation DIFFERENCE PRICE LIN COTTON Weaving

Linen being more expensive than cotton, it is simply the price of raw material that affects the price of the final product. The difference in the purchase of the raw material is therefore 3.5 times higher, and yet Denim Lin is not 3.5 times more expensive than a 100% cotton jeans. Fortunately, otherwise the 1st jeans to push in France would cost ... 400 €!

"Become the cool and fun boy from the class"

Bring up to date a fiber a little forgotten like flax, This is the crazy bet in which we launched ourselves. A crazy bet that earned us 24 months of development to weave the perfect canvas.

Today, the Denim Lin canvas supports up to 80,000 cycles, that is to say 80,000 repeated frictions on the canvas before giving in. Our linen jeans is therefore as resistant as a cotton jeans. Finally, maybe the first in class has enough to become the cool and fun boy of the promo!

 

Dao Denim Lin Jeans Men Slim

 

Do not hesitate to interact with us in the comments and if you have your linen jeans, do not hesitate to share your impressions with us.

March 30, 2019 — Davy Dao

Comments

Davy Dao said:

Bonjour JB,

Je réponds à vos questions juste en dessous.
– Sur l’illustration de la consommation d’eau du Lin vs Coton bio vs Coton, c’est pour quelle quantité de matière ?

1 kg

– Vous dites qu’il y’a 125 fois moins de Lin produit que de Coton, mais qu’il y’a 450m de coton tissé chaque jour vs 175m de lin tissé chaque jour ; soit à peine 3 fois moins de Lin ; le poids au mètre d’une pièce de Lin est 40 fois plus légère ?

C’est à titre d’exemple, une comparaison entre le coton et le lin. Ce sont les rendements que connaissent de nombreux tisseurs, cela ne veut pas dire qu’ils tissent chaque jour du lin et/ou du coton. Vous dites « seulement » 3 fois moins de lin, avec le coût du travail en France, faire le même nombre d’heure et produire 3x moins de tissu, cela impacte tout de même le prix du tissu fini.

– Vous dite « ce qui est rare est cher » : mais en réalité le « rare » en absolu ne veut rien dire, il faut le comparer à la demande. Si personne ne veut de jean en poil de putois, le fait qu’il y’ait peu de tissu en poil de putois sur le marché ne fait pas augmenter son prix.

Le lin est cher car la production est moins importante que celle du coton et d’une année sur l’autre, 90% de la production française de lin est achetée avant récolte. Bien évidemment le coût du travail en France joue également.

Quand on sait qu’on peut retrouver le lin en tissus d’ameublement, en vêtements ou encore dans certaines pièces automobiles c’est une matière qui est extrêmement demandée.

– Le fait que le lin soit cultivé à 60% en France (plus grosses charges sociales) puis exportés en Asie (plus gros coût de transport vs du Coton Indien et Chinois) a-t-il un impact visible dans le prix final ? Ou le coût de la matière première est-il négligeable par rapport à son coût de transformation (voire est-il compensé par le fait qu’il y’a une économie d’eau) ?

Depuis la date de parution de cet article, le fil de lin que nous achètons pour fabriquer nos jeans a augmenté d’environ 40%. C’est vraiment l’offre et la demande qui guide les prix d’une saison sur l’autre. La transformation de notre lin se fait en Europe et bientôt en France afin d’être vraiment vertueux. Les lins que nous utilisons actuellement n’ont pas été filés en Chine.

Merci pour votre commentaire !

JB said:

J’ai quelques questions suite à la lecture de cette page :
- Sur l’illustration de la consommation d’eau du Lin vs Coton bio vs Coton, c’est pour quelle quantité de matière ?
- Vous dites qu’il y’a 125 fois moins de Lin produit que de Coton, mais qu’il y’a 450m de coton tissé chaque jour vs 175m de lin tissé chaque jour ; soit à peine 3 fois moins de Lin ; le poids au mètre d’une pièce de Lin est 40 fois plus légère ?
- Vous dite “ce qui est rare est cher” : mais en réalité le “rare” en absolu ne veut rien dire, il faut le comparer à la demande. Si personne ne veut de jean en poil de putois, le fait qu’il y’ait peu de tissu en poil de putois sur le marché ne fait pas augmenter son prix
- Le fait que le lin soit cultivé à 60% en France (plus grosses charges sociales) puis exportés en Asie (plus gros coût de transport vs du Coton Indien et Chinois) a-t-il un impact visible dans le prix final ? Ou le coût de la matière première est-il négligeable par rapport à son coût de transformation (voire est-il compensé par le fait qu’il y’a une économie d’eau) ?
Merci d’avance pour vos réponses !

Weber said:

Bonjour,
Mais où trouvez en boutique au plus proche de Belfort des jeans en lin ?(les déplacements …. ne sont pas écolo)
Merci, salutations

Duparc Alain said:

Bravo
Du fait en France!

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